New Resource: Charter School Financial Oversight for COVID-19 and Beyond

Stay Updated With The Latest News

NACSA is committed to sharing regular updates on the latest federal COVID-19 information available in an effort to highlight education policies taking place during the pandemic. Primarily, these updates will focus on the latest packages Congress is considering and guidance from the U.S. Department of Education.

New Resource: Charter School Financial Oversight for COVID-19 and Beyond

NACSA’s Financial Oversight Resource

The full financial impact of COVID-19 on charter schooling is unknown, but financial challenges lie ahead this year and beyond. But not all schools will feel the financial impact of COVID-19 equally. That’s why authorizers must play both an oversight and advocacy role in supporting charter schools as they work through short- and long-term financial challenges.  

At NACSA we’ve gathered a working group of authorizers, lenders, consultants, financial services providers, and other stakeholders to consider the financial impact on charter schools, and the role of authorizers in navigating that impact. Schools must have access to the resources they need to effectively educate students—and must properly manage those resources—in order to serve students and communities well. 

The following financial oversight resources provide authorizers with key guidance, as well as tools and sample effective practices from authorizers and Financial Service Providers (FSPs), on school budgeting and financial planning, school oversight and monitoring, and the role of the authorizer, right now.  

Authorizers need to work together with charter schools to plan for and mitigate potential budgetary challenges, while at the same time advocating for adequate funding for charters. For some authorizers, this may mean making minimal changes to how they work. Other authorizers may need to adjust their systems and, in some cases, adopt new authorizing best practices for financial oversight without adding layers of unnecessary compliance burdens on school operators.  

Authorizers cannot do this work alone: they must partner with communities—including schools and lenders—to ensure that all students have access to schools that meet their academic and social-emotional needs.  

This suite of resources includes: 

Visit AuthoRISE—NACSA’s comprehensive digital learning community—to access the full resource suite as well as other resources to strengthen your authorizing practices. Anyone can access all of our new COVID-19 resources in AuthoRISE by emailing AuthoRISE@qualitycharters.org  and requesting a login. 

This resource was developed by and in collaboration with:  

Karega Rausch, NACSA; David Greenberg, NACSA; Adrian Ruiz, Raza Development Fund; Barb Acenowr, SUNYBrittany Bennet, Self-HelpBryan Hassel, Public ImpactBrian Dickey, Indianapolis ISDJames Bentley, Indiana Charter School BoardJim Ford, Ford Research and Solutions, Inc.Paul O’Neill, National Center for Special Education in Charter Schools and Todd Ziebarth, National Alliance for Public Charter Schools 


Most Recent Posts
President Biden’s Proposed Increase in Education Spending Could Be a Boost for Charter Schools
On Friday, President Biden released his “skinny budget”, a proposal for fiscal year 2022 containing top-line spending numbers. Congress rarely takes up the President’s proposed budget wholesale, but the proposal,...
What Happens When You Take the “Independent” Out of Independent Chartering Board
Maine and Hawaii are two of 17 states with an independent chartering board (ICBs). ICBs are a type of charter school authorizer often called a state charter commission. Where they...
Rebuilding Our “Love Bubble” To Take Care of Our Charter School Community
This piece was written by Arthur Samuels, Executive Director, Pagee Cheung, Principal, Princess Francois, Assistant Principal of Math & Science, and Dwayne James, Social Worker & Director of Diversity, Equity,...