Knowledge Core Keyword: Performance Contracting

Existing Schools Information Template

This is the Existing Schools Information Template that accompanies NACSA’s Knowledge Core course, “Charter Application Process and Decision Making: Evaluating School Replicators.” This template is intended for authorizers to use to keep a clear record of important criteria for existing schools in one place for easy comparison.

Core Resource: Core Charter School Contract

This Core Contract can be customized by authorizers to meet a variety of circumstances. Some of the sections include: Governance, Third-Party Management Providers, English-Language Learners, Students with Disabilities, School Performance Standards and more.

Growing Great Schools in New Jersey

“I don’t think that would work too well here; we’re pretty unique.”

Authorizers around the country have said this since the first authorizing shop opened in Minnesota in 1992. Sometimes, the concern is well-founded. Not every problem requires an identical solution.

But as the charter school sector expands and matures, the database of what’s needed and what works grows more robust. Certain patterns have emerged and NACSA is paying close attention to them.

This case study is one in a series that explores local progress on charter school authorizing in various corners of our country. We’ll dig into what was needed, how it happened, and why it matters to the ultimate quest we’re all on: creating and sustaining great public schools for all U.S. children.

The series continues on our nation’s East Coast, in New Jersey, a microcosm of all the promise and problems in our nation’s public school system. We pay attention to New Jersey—a state that has been chartering schools since 1997—for its dramatic efforts to improve authorizing practices during the last few years. They have stepped away from mere compliance into the light of performance, shaking up the status quo and deciding that “as good as” wasn’t good enough for their charter school sector.

Charter Schools and English Language Learners: What Authorizers Need to Know (Infographic)

Charter school authorizers are responsible for protecting student and public interests. This responsibility requires authorizers to hold schools accountable for fulfilling fundamental public education obligations to all students, including providing equal access and appropriate services to students whose native language is not English. English Language Learners (ELLs) have rights that are protected by federal and state laws. Authorizers are responsible for ensuring that charter schools uphold these rights.

Charter Schools and English Language Learners What Authorizers Need to Know

Charter school authorizers are responsible for protecting student and public interests. This responsibility requires authorizers to hold schools accountable for fulfilling fundamental public education obligations to all students, including providing equal access and appropriate services to students whose native language is not English. English Language Learners (ELLs) have rights that are protected by federal and state laws. Authorizers are responsible for ensuring that charter schools uphold these rights.

Authorizers, Charter Schools and AYP Accountability

This NCLB Policy Brief examines authorizer obligations in NCLB implementation. Those new to the authorizing role will gain understanding of how “typical” authorizing responsibilities intersect with NCLB accountability. Furthermore, experienced authorizers can use this Brief to spot-check whether their practices are in fact fulfilling the various NCLB-related obligations for which they are responsible.

Topics of interest include: accountability, law and policy

Anecdotes Aren’t Enough: An Evidence-Based Approach to Accountability for Alternative Charter Schools (Webinar Presentation)

Authorizers are challenged to hold each alternative charter school accountable for its performance. NACSA convened a working group of uthorizers, operators, and researchers to define the parameters of good practice when it comes to evaluating alternative charter schools. The group’s findings are presented in NACSA’s new report, Anecdotes Aren’t Enough: An Evidence-Based Approach to Accountability for Alternative Charter Schools.

This presentation is from a webinar panel discussion with working group members Ernie Silva, Director of External Affairs for SIATech (California); Naomi DeVeaux, Deputy Director of D.C. Public Charter School Board; and Nelson Smith, Senior Advisor for NACSA. The panelists discuss NACSA’s new report, Anecdotes Aren’t Enough: An Evidence-Based Approach to Accountability for Alternative Charter Schools and the implications of its findings for authorizers, schools, and policy-makers.

Want to learn more on this topic prior to the webinar? Read Anecdotes Aren’t Enough: An Evidence-Based Approach to Accountability for Alternative Charter Schools and share our summary of recommendations with your staff, colleagues, and board members.

Anecdotes Aren’t Enough: An Evidence-Based Approach to Accountability for Alternative Charter Schools

Authorizers are challenged to hold each alternative charter school accountable for its performance. NACSA convened a working group of authorizers, operators, and researchers to define the parameters of good practice when it comes to evaluating alternative charter schools. The group’s findings are presented in this new report from NACSA.

Alignment for Change in Hawaii

This case study is one in a series that explores local progress on charter school authorizing in various corners of our country. We’ll dig into what was needed, how it happened, and why it matters to the ultimate quest we all share: creating and sustaining great public schools for all U.S. children.

The series starts in our nation’s most far-flung locale: Hawaii.

Action Plan for Closure: Core Closure Protocol and Guidance

If you attended the 2012 NACSA Leadership Conference, you probably heard reference to NACSA’s Accountability in Action: A Comprehensive Guide to Charter School Closure. This resource is designed to assist the staff and board members of authorizing agencies as they address the wide array of challenges involved in any closure decision. Now NACSA has made it even easier to use this resource by converting the publication’s Action Plan for Closure into a new format allowing authorizers to customize their own plan, track its status, and make notes to help guide their closure process.

Accountability in Action: A Comprehensive Guide to Charter School Closure

This Comprehensive Guide to Charter School Closure is designed to assist the staff and board members of authorizing agencies as they address the wide array of challenges involved in any closure decision. It draws directly upon the successful experiences of other authorizers across the country and includes useful information on performance management, decision-making, and stakeholder communication, as well as practical tools to successfully manage a charter school closure.

Accountability in Action: A Comprehensive Guide to Charter School Closure

This Comprehensive Guide to Charter School Closure is designed to assist the staff and board members of authorizing agencies as they address the wide array of challenges involved in any closure decision. It draws directly upon the successful experiences of other authorizers across the country and includes useful information on performance management, decision-making, and stakeholder communication, as well as practical tools to successfully manage a charter school closure.