Knowledge Core Keyword: Application Process and Decision Making

Example Charter School Application Evaluation Criteria: Tennessee Achievement School District

This is the charter school application evaluation criteria used by the Tennessee Achievement School District in its annual charter school application process. This document is a Core Example that accompanies NACSA’s Knowledge Core course, “Charter Application Process and Decision Making: An Overview.”

Example Charter School Application Evaluation Criteria: Louisiana Department of Education

This is the charter school application evaluation criteria used by Louisiana Department of Education in its annual charter school application process. This document is a Core Example that accompanies NACSA’s Knowledge Core course, “Charter Application Process and Decision Making: An Overview.”

Example Board Member Questionnaire: Tennessee Achievement School District

This is a questionnaire for prospective board members used by the Tennessee Achievement School District in its charter school application process. The questionnaire is a required element of each charter school application and is used to check for board member eligibility, potential or existing conflicts of interest, and to evaluate board member capacity. This document is a Core Example that accompanies NACSA’s Knowledge Core course, “Charter Application Process and Decision Making: An Overview.”

Example Board Member Questionnaire: Louisiana Department of Education

This is a questionnaire for prospective board members used by the Louisiana Department of Education in its charter school application process. The questionnaire is a required element of each charter school application and is used to check for board member eligibility, potential or existing conflicts of interest, and to evaluate board member capacity. This document is a Core Example that accompanies NACSA’s Knowledge Core course, “Charter Application Process and Decision Making: An Overview.”

Growing Great Schools in New Jersey

“I don’t think that would work too well here; we’re pretty unique.”

Authorizers around the country have said this since the first authorizing shop opened in Minnesota in 1992. Sometimes, the concern is well-founded. Not every problem requires an identical solution.

But as the charter school sector expands and matures, the database of what’s needed and what works grows more robust. Certain patterns have emerged and NACSA is paying close attention to them.

This case study is one in a series that explores local progress on charter school authorizing in various corners of our country. We’ll dig into what was needed, how it happened, and why it matters to the ultimate quest we’re all on: creating and sustaining great public schools for all U.S. children.

The series continues on our nation’s East Coast, in New Jersey, a microcosm of all the promise and problems in our nation’s public school system. We pay attention to New Jersey—a state that has been chartering schools since 1997—for its dramatic efforts to improve authorizing practices during the last few years. They have stepped away from mere compliance into the light of performance, shaking up the status quo and deciding that “as good as” wasn’t good enough for their charter school sector.

Viewpoint: Differentiated Charter Authorizing Strategies for Innovation, Scale, and Quality

A maturing charter sector still operates on first-generation laws designed to launch a few experimental schools. However, the charter sector has moved beyond this initial launch stage of its development. The new focus on scaling quality and the growth of managed networks has placed particular demands on old policies, practices, and authorizing capabilities. Growth in online and blended learning, interest in high-level STEM, and conversions and turnaround are additional new pressures on the one-size-fits-some process. States should update authorizing laws to incorporate multiple pathways and new capacities that reflect the realities of the charter landscape, and take advantage of emerging opportunities to add quality educational options.

Viewpoint: Authorizing Online Learning

“During this decade, American education will shift from print to digital, from flat and sequential content to engaging and adaptive, and from batch processing to personalized learning. There will also be a slow enrollment shift from traditional district-operated schools to schools and programs operated by organizations authorized under contracts or charter.

As chief executive officer and chair of the International Association for K–12 Online Learning (iNACOL), we believe that one of the most important drivers of this historic shift is online learning. It is growing by more than 40 percent annually and creating new full- and part-time options for students and families. This paper refers specifically to online schools where instruction is delivered remotely by live teachers on a full- and part-time basis, also known as virtual or cyber learning.